Defend DACA Rally: Insights from This Social Do-Gooder

SC DACA Rally

Defend DACA Rally: Insights from This Social Do-Gooder


30 or 40 people showed up to this rally held in Columbia, SC on December 5th. I expected a huge crowd blocking the street and causing a disruption to traffic. I hoped for a loud boom of voices chanting for Senator Tim Scott to support the Dream Act.[spacer height="20px"]
 
That wasn’t the case. There wasn’t this big crowd or loud voices. It was me and dozens of others with their poster boards. Some marked “Here to stay” and others “Support the Clean Dream Act.”[spacer height="20px"]
 
I was hesitant to join the group. I couldn’t hide behind someone. I couldn’t blend in and assimilate as much as I wanted.[spacer height="20px"]
 
Nervous, I approached the crowd filled advocates of all ages. I began to shake my board across my chest. Timidly.[spacer height="20px"]
As I stood on the corner, in front of the bank of America building, I realized something. My shame stemmed from what I thought a protest/rally should look like instead of what it meant.[spacer height="20px"]
 
I know what thousands of protesters look like. Thanks to the Black Lives Matter Movement and Women’s March.[spacer height="20px"]
 
I wanted to be part of that. To be suffocated with bodies, energy, and rants by people who supported what I believed in.[spacer height="20px"]
 
That is not what I was experiencing. But then I realized that I was judging the size of the rally unfairly. I was viewing the rally based on quantitative measures. The numbers didn’t matter because if one person can make a difference, why can’t 30 or 40? And if thousands can march on Washington, why can’t 30 or 40 local residents march on the lawn of Senator Scott’s office?[spacer height="20px"]
 
I grew more and more comfortable. I had to face my own insecurities, misconceptions, and biases. I was forced to let go of my internal issues because young people are facing a dramatic change in their lives. These children were nearing the edge of a cliff. They were going to be booted from the only home that they know.[spacer height="20px"]
 
How selfish of me? I was thinking about my self and how uncomfortable I felt standing on a street corner for an hour and a half. That’s not a lifetime. It’s a moment of my day spent advocating for young people whose lives are going to change permanently.[spacer height="20px"]
 
Disruption has no particular way it should be done. You show up and show out. No matter how many people.[spacer height="20px"]
 
We stood there. We chanted. We marched around the intersection (yes, abiding by traffic and pedestrian laws). More people joined us. Drivers honked their horns in support of our efforts to:[spacer height="20px"]
 

  • Prevent 800,000 young people from losing status
  • Discuss and Improve our Immigration System[spacer height="20px"]

 I asked for this. The opportunity to get more involved in my community. To be the Social Do-Gooder who writes this blog. That’s what I got.[spacer height="20px"]
 
Often times, we think doing good entails this extravagant effort. Whether it’s building a home for a family, or raising millions of dollars for a charity or cause. In fact, doing good can be a simple act. Like standing on a corner with a sign to raise awareness about the impending end of DACA.[spacer height="20px"]
 
It’s just one decision. One action that is required. If you’re in, then do IT wholeheartedly. IT can be a difference in one person’s life. My simple act is an ongoing battle for 800,000 people. I can’t lose sight of that.[spacer height="20px"]
 
Let’s get comfortable with the uncomfortable. And measure success on what’s accomplished and not on who and how many people decide to join the cause.[spacer height="20px"]
 
Message to myself.
Adriana (1)

What are some actions you're taking in your community? Share with us!


[fts_instagram instagram_id=2022957879 pics_count=6 type=user width=40 height=350px profile_wrap=no super_gallery=yes columns=3 force_columns=yes space_between_photos=1px icon_size=65px hide_date_likes_comments=no]
[fts_twitter twitter_name=Travepreneur tweets_count=3 cover_photo=no stats_bar=no show_retweets=yes show_replies=no]

Find More Articles Here

Find More Articles Here

Find More Articles Here

Find More Articles Here

Copyright © 2017 Travepreneur. All Rights Reserved. |Terms & Conditions|Privacy Policy|Comment & Permission Policy|

No Comments

Comments are closed.